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You don't need a Kindle device to read Amazon books. The Kindle app supports a host of different devices(Opens in a new window), including Windows and Mac computers, as well as iOS, iPadOS, and Android mobile devices. It can handle books from Amazon as well as anything from your library via Libby(Opens in a new window).


Aimed at both ebooks and audiobooks, the Kobo Books app(Opens in a new window) is available for Windows, macOS, iOS/iPadOS, and Android. It lets you read books downloaded from the Kobo store(Opens in a new window) as well as imported books saved as PDFs or EPUBs.


Libby(Opens in a new window) allows you to borrow ebooks from your local library; all you need is a library card. The app works for iOS, iPadOS, and Android devices, or you can use it directly through your web browser. After you sign in with your library card and account, you can browse or search for a book among the virtual stacks.


FBReader(Opens in a new window) lets you read books downloaded from its own network library or those that you manually import from other sources. The app supports a variety of formats, including PDF, ePub, mobi, RTF, HTML, and plain text. Versions of the app are available for iOS, iPadOS, Android, Windows, and Linux.


Designed for iOS and iPadOS, KyBook(Opens in a new window) offers access to various book catalogs, including Project Gutenberg and Feedbooks. You can add additional online catalogs and incorporate books from folders saved on your device or among your cloud-based storage sites. The app supports a healthy array of formats, such as ePUB, PDF, mobi, text, and RTF.


Android-only FullReader(Opens in a new window) allows you to pull in a variety of different ebooks from your device or from the cloud. The app supports many different formats, including ePUB, PDF, mobi, txt, doc, docx, and HTML. You can scan for books stored on your device and then import the ones you want to read. For books stored in the cloud, you connect to Google Drive, Dropbox, or Microsoft OneDrive, and download them to your device.


Aimed at iOS/iPadOS(Opens in a new window) and Android(Opens in a new window) devices, PocketBook Reader lets you grab books from its own store, those stored on your device, those saved in the cloud (Dropbox, Google Drive, and PocketBook Cloud), and those downloaded from Google Books. The app supports both ebooks and audiobooks in 26 different formats, such as ePUB, mobi, PDF, RTF, text, HTML, MP3, and M4B.


To purchase new books for the Barnes & Noble NOOK App for both iOS and Android, visit BN.com in your device's web browser (Safari/Chrome or other) or on a desktop/laptop computer. eBooks purchased on BN.com will automatically sync to your NOOK Library.


UCSF Library provides access to a growing collection of over 100,000 ebooks in the health sciences and related subjects. To find the ebooks the UCSF Library subscribes to:


Most of the ebooks are licensed for UCSF users only. In order to access these ebooks, you must be on the UCSF network. Please check the directions for Remote Access in the box below.


The rise of e-books in American culture is part of a larger story about a shift from printed to digital material. Using a broader definition of e-content in a survey ending in December 2011, some 43% of Americans age 16 and older say they have either read an e-book in the past year or have read other long-form content such as magazines, journals, and news articles in digital format on an e-book reader, tablet computer, regular computer, or cell phone.


Those who have taken the plunge into reading e-books stand out in almost every way from other kinds of readers. Foremost, they are relatively avid readers of books in all formats: 88% of those who read e-books in the past 12 months also read printed books.2 Compared with other book readers, they read more books. They read more frequently for a host of reasons: for pleasure, for research, for current events, and for work or school. They are also more likely than others to have bought their most recent book, rather than borrowed it, and they are more likely than others to say they prefer to purchase books in general, often starting their search online.


The average reader of e-books says she has read 24 books (the mean number) in the past 12 months, compared with an average of 15 books by a non-e-book consumer. Some 78% of those ages 16 and older say they read a book in the past 12 months. Those readers report they have read an average (or mean number) of 17 books in the past year and 8 books as a median (midpoint) number.


Those who read e-books report they have read more books in all formats. They reported an average of 24 books in the previous 12 months and had a median of 13 books. Those who do not read e-books say they averaged 15 books in the previous year and the median was 6 books.


For device owners, those who own e-book readers also stand out. They say they have read an average of 24 books in the previous year (vs. 16 books by those who do not own that device). They report having read a median of 12 books (vs. 7 books by those who do not own the device).


Overall, those who reported reading the most books in the past year include: women compared with men; whites compared with minorities; well-educated Americans compared with less-educated Americans; and those age 65 and older compared with younger age groups.


30% of those who read e-content say they now spend more time reading, and owners of tablets and e-book readers particularly stand out as reading more now. Some 41% of tablet owners and 35% of e-reading device owners said they are reading more since the advent of e-content. Fully 42% of readers of e-books said they are reading more now that long-form reading material is available in digital format. The longer people have owned an e-book reader or tablet, the more likely they are to say they are reading more: 41% of those who have owned either device for more than a year say they are reading more vs. 35% of those who have owned either device for less than six months who say they are reading more.


The prevalence of e-book reading is markedly growing, but printed books still dominate the world of book readers. In our December 2011 survey, we found that 72% of American adults had read a printed book and 11% listened to an audiobook in the previous year, compared with the 17% of adults who had read an e-book.


In a head-to-head competition, people prefer e-books to printed books when they want speedy access and portability, but print wins out when people are reading to children and sharing books with others. We asked a series of questions about format preferences among the 14% of Americans age 16 and up who in the past 12 months have read both printed books and e-books.


As a rule, dual-platform readers preferred e-books when they wanted to get a book quickly, when they were traveling or commuting, and when they were looking for a wide selection. However, print was strongly preferred over e-books when it came to reading to children and sharing books with others. When asked about reading books in bed, the verdict was split: 45% prefer reading e-books in bed, while 43% prefer print.


The majority of book readers prefer to buy rather than borrow. A majority of print readers (54%) and readers of e-books (61%) prefer to purchase their own copies of these books. Meanwhile, most audiobook listeners prefer to borrow their audiobooks; just one in three audiobook listeners (32%) prefer to purchase audiobooks they want to listen to, while 61% prefer to borrow them. Those who own e-book reading devices and tablet computers are more likely than others to prefer to purchase.


For internet users who read e-books, online bookstores are the first stop. Asked where they start their search for an e-book they want to read, 75% of e-book readers start their search at an online bookstore or website. Some 12% start at the library.


Demographics of e-book readers. In our survey ending in February 2012, we found that 29% of adult book readers had read an e-book in the past 12 months. Overall, that comes to 21% of all adults. Those who read e-books are more likely to be under age 50, have some college education, and live in households earning more than $50,000.


Device owners are more likely to buy books. Some 61% of e-reading device owners said they purchased the most recent book they read, compared with 48% of all readers. Another 15% said they had borrowed their most recent book from a friend or family member (vs. 24% of all readers), and 10% said they borrowed it from a library (vs.14% of all readers).


Book recommendations. Overall, owners of e-reading devices are more likely than all Americans 16 and older to get book recommendations from people they knew (81% vs. 64%) and bookstore staff (31% vs. 23%). In addition, compared with the general public, owners of e-reading devices who use the internet are also more likely to get recommendations from online bookstores or other websites (56% vs. 34%).


Gallup e-books are formatted as EPUB and MOBI files and can be read on most computers, tablets, e-readers and mobile devices. EPUB files are the most popular open book format and are compatible with many devices. MOBI files are compatible with Kindle devices and applications only.


You can download and read Gallup e-books on computers, e-readers and via reading apps on most tablets and smartphones. Gallup provides e-books in EPUB and MOBI formats, making them compatible with most devices.


Publishers of books in all formats made almost $26 billion in revenue last year in the U.S., with print making up $22.6 billion and e-books taking $2.04 billion, according to the Association of American Publishers' annual report 2019. Those figures include trade and educational books, as well as fiction.


While digital media has disrupted other industries such as news publishing and the music business, people still love to own physical books, according to Meryl Halls, managing director of the Booksellers' Association in the U.K. 59ce067264






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